What does a CT show?

Computed tomography (CT) is an advanced type of x-ray. It creates detailed images (pictures) of bone and soft tissues such as organs and blood vessels. You can get act done on any part of your body.  It can detect fractures, organ damage, cancer, and even something as small as a blood clot.

Preparation for your test:

  • There is no test preparation. You may eat, drink, and take your medications as you usually would.
  • If you are pregnant or think that you might be pregnant, please inform the technologist prior to the CT Scan, as radiation can be harmful to the unborn fetus.
  • Please be sure to wear comfortable clothing without snaps or buttons if possible. You will be asked to remove any metal objects that are located near the area being scanned. This includes jewelry, belts, and underwire bras.

What happens during the test?

  • This test will require you to lay on a table and hold very still so that we make take detailed pictures of the body part being imaged.
  • During the scan, you may be asked to hold your breath.
  • The total time that you will be on the CT table will be around 15 minutes.
  • A registered CT Technologist will be taking your images and is trained to keep the radiation dose as low as possible.

What happens after the test?

  • There are no side effects to this test, and you may resume your normal activities.

What does a CTA/CT with contrast show?

A CT or CTA (Computed Tomography Angiography) is a specialized type of x-ray that is focused on the organs, veins, and arteries of your body.  The CTA specifically focuses on detailed images of the arteries and allows the radiologist to see if there is an aneurysm (ballooning of the blood vessel wall), stenosis (narrowing of a blood vessel), or to see if a stent that has been inserted to keep a vessel open is working correctly.  This is accomplished by using a special dye that is injected into a vein.

Preparation for your test?

  • Please do not eat for 6 hours prior to your exam. Unless you have congestive heart failure, drink plenty of water prior to your test and plenty of water after your test.
  • All jewelry and metal objects will need to be removed from the area that is being scanned. This includes belts, underwire bra, and jewelry.
  • If you are having a CT of your abdomen/pelvis, you may be told to arrive early in order to drink a special contrast to highlight your bowel.
  • If you have a history of allergies to food or medications, specifically iodine or ct contrast, please let your physician know prior to having this exam, as you may need to be pre-medicated.
  • You will need to have labs done within 7 days of this exam to test your kidney function. If your lab values are off, you may also need to be pre-medicated.  Please let your physician know if you have a history of a kidney transplant and/or failure.
  • Follow up labs must be done between 24-72 hours after CT.
  • If you are a diabetic, unless directed otherwise, you make take your Metformin/Glucophage prior to your exam. You will not take it after the exam until your kidney function has again been checked.
  • If you are pregnant or think you might be pregnant, please notify the technologist as radiation can be harmful to the unborn fetus.

What happens during the test?

  • You will lay on a table and have an IV started. This table will pull you through a donut-shaped scanner while taking pictures as the dye is being injected into the IV.
  • You will need to stay very still, and you will be asked to hold your breath for a few seconds.
  • The contrast or dye might give you a metallic taste in your mouth and make you feel warm all over. This will last about 30 seconds and will not return.
  • Most exams only take about 10-15 minutes.
  • A registered CT Technologist will be taking your images and is trained to keep the radiation dose as low as possible.

What happens after the test?

  • There are no side effects to this test.
  • Please remember to drink plenty of water, and if you are diabetic, do not take your metformin until after you’ve had your labs drawn and have been given permission to resume the medication.

What is Coronary Artery CTA?

A coronary computed tomography angiogram (CTA) uses advanced CT technology, along with intravenous contrast (CT dye), to obtain high resolution, 3D pictures of the moving heart and its vessels.  These images enable physicians to determine whether plaque or calcium deposits are present inside the arteries. CTA is a noninvasive method for detecting blockages in the coronary arteries and can be performed much faster than a cardiac Cath, with potentially less risk and discomfort as well as decreased recovery time.

Preparation for your test?

  1. Do not eat 6 hours prior to your scheduled test time. We still ask that you drink plenty of water before and after your test.
  2. No coffee, tea, or caffeine products 12 hours prior to your test.
  3. Do not take antihistamines for 12 hours prior to the test.
  4. No erectile dysfunction medications for 48 hours prior to the test, such as Cialis or Viagra.
  5. Do NOT smoke 4 hours prior to the test.
  6. You will be required to have labs drawn within 7 days of this study to check your kidney function prior to contrast injection. If you have a known kidney problem or history of transplant, please alert the Physician prior to having this study.
  7. You will receive an injection of Iodinated contrast for this test. If you have a known allergy or reaction to CT contrast/Iodinated contrast, please notify the Physician so that we can pre-medicate you for this test.
  8. If you know that you are pregnant, or think that you might be pregnant, please notify the technologist in advance, as radiation to the unborn fetus may be harmful.
  9. If you are a diabetic and take Metformin/Glucophage/Metformin containing products, you must discontinue use for 24 hours after the exam. At that time, you will have blood drawn to check your kidney function again before starting back on the medication. You may take all other medications as prescribed unless otherwise directed.
  10. Wear loose, comfortable clothing without metal or zippers if possible.
  11. If you were given any type of pre-medication for contrast allergy, please remember to take them as directed.
  12. Try to relax and avoid strenuous situations prior to your test. We need your heart rate around 65 beats per minute in order to obtain a good study.

What happens during the test?

  1. You will lay on a table on your back, have an IV started, and then bring your hands behind your head.
  2. Small pads or patches called electrodes will be put on your chest. Wires connect the pads to an ECG (electrocardiogram) machine. The machine records the electrical activity of your heart.
  3. The table will then move you through the center of a giant donut-shaped scanner.
  4. The contrast or dye might give you a metallic taste in your mouth and make you feel warm all over. This will last about 30 seconds and will not return.
  5. As you move through the scanner, you will need to stay very still, and you will be asked to hold your breath for a few seconds.
  6. Most tests only take about 20 minutes.
  7. A registered CT Technologist will be taking your images and is trained to keep the radiation dose as low as possible.

What happens after the test?

  • There are no side effects to this test.
  • Please remember to drink plenty of water, and if you are diabetic, do not take your metformin until after you’ve had your labs drawn and have been given permission to resume the medication.

What are Adrenal Glands?

Adrenal glands are triangular-shaped glands located on top of the kidneys. They produce hormones such as estrogen, progesterone, steroids, cortisol, and cortisone, and chemicals such as adrenalin (epinephrine), norepinephrine, and dopamine.

The CT scan of the abdomen (also called CAT scan) is very accurate at examining the adrenal glands and other abdominal structures and can be used on any type of adrenal tumor. The CT scan is painless. It will take about 30 minutes to complete

When the glands produce more or fewer hormones than required by the body, disease conditions may occur.

DIABETIC PATIENTS:

If you are a diabetic patient taking any medication that contains Metformin (Glucophage, Glucovance, Metaglip, Actoplus, Prandimet, Kombiglyze, Janumet, Avandamet, Fortamet, and Riomet) and are scheduled for an examination that requires IV contrast (CT, IVP or Arthrogram) DO NOT take your medication on the day of the exam and for 48 hours after. You MUST follow up with your physician for instructions / blood test on when to resume this medication.

ALLERGIES TO CONTRAST:

If you have a history of contrast reaction, your ordering physician is responsible for prescribing the pre-medications for you. The American College of Radiology recommends the following pre-medications: • Prednisone 50mg taken by mouth 13, 7 and 1 hour prior to the examination.

CREATININE BLOOD TEST:

This is required within the 7 days prior to the study for any:

  • Diabetes (Insulin and non-insulin dependent)
  • History of Renal Insufficiency / Renal masses / Single kidney
  • Patients age 18 years or older (CT)

CT SCAN (Allow 1-2 hours for this examination) NOTHING to eat for 6 hours prior to the exam. You may have clear liquids only (water, apple juice). You may take your medications at their usual time with clear liquids only.

Women: If there is ANY chance that you may be pregnant, let your doctor know before proceeding with the preparation and/or examination.

What is a Lung Cancer Screening exam?

Our comprehensive Lung Screening Program offers lung screening computed tomography (CT) to patients. The goal is to save lives by discovering and treating lung cancer or disease at its earliest, most treatable stages. Lung cancer takes more lives than any other cancer worldwide.

Early detection of lung cancer is the most powerful way to reduce the risk of death from this disease. Lung screening CT can find lung cancer before symptoms develop, and cancer spreads.

You are considered high-risk if:

  • You are between the ages of 55 – 80
  • You have smoked cigarettes in the last 15 years
  • You have a smoking history of at least 1 pack per day for 30 years or comparable (i.e., ½ pack per day for 60 years).

Preparation for the test:

  • There is no preparation for this test. You may eat, drink, and take all medications as you normally would.
  • Please wear comfortable clothing and remove all metal from the area being scanned. This will include belts, jewelry, and underwire bras.

What happens during the test?

During the scan, you will lie on a table that will move you through the center of a donut-shaped CT scanner. As you are moved through the scanner, you will need to stay as still as possible. We may ask you to hold your breath for a few seconds while we take images of your chest.

Most lung screening scans take less than 10 seconds. The entire test is usually completed in five minutes.

What happens after the test?

  • There are no side effects to this test, and you may resume your normal activities.

What is Coronary Artery CTA?

A coronary computed tomography angiogram (CTA) uses advanced CT technology, along with intravenous contrast (ct dye), to obtain high resolution, 3D pictures of the moving heart and its vessels.  These images enable physicians to determine whether plaque or calcium deposits are present inside the arteries. CTA is a noninvasive method for detecting blockages in the coronary arteries and can be performed much faster than a cardiac cath, with potentially less risk and discomfort as well as decreased recovery time.

Preparation for your test?

  • Do not eat 6 hours prior to your scheduled test time. We still ask that you drink plenty of water before and after your test.
  • Do not have caffeine or caffeine containing products for 12 hours prior to your test.
  • Do not take antihistamines for 12 hours prior to the test.
  • No erectile dysfunction medications for 48 hours prior to the test.
  • No smoking for 4 hours prior to the test.
  • You will be required to have labs drawn within 7 days of this study to check your kidney function prior to contrast injection. If you have a known kidney problem or history of transplant, please alert the Physician prior to having this study.
  • You will receive an injection of Iodinated contrast for this test. If you have a known allergy or reaction to CT contrast/Iodinated contrast, please notify the Physician so that we can pre-medicate you for this test.
  • If you know that you are pregnant, or think that you might be pregnant, please notify the technologist in advance, as radiation to the unborn fetus may be harmful.
  • If you are a diabetic and take Metformin/Glucophage/Metformin containing products, you must discontinue use for 24 hours after the exam. At that time, you will have blood drawn to check your kidney function again before starting back on the medication. You may take all other medications as prescribed unless otherwise directed.
  • Wear loose comfortable clothing without metal or zippers if possible.
  • If you were given any type of pre-medication for contrast allergy, please remember to take them as directed.
  • Try to relax and avoid strenuous situations prior to your test. We need your heart rate around 65 beats per minute in order to obtain a good study.

What happens during the test?

  • You will lay on a table on your back, have an IV started and then bring your hands behind your head.
  • Small pads or patches called electrodes will be put on your chest. Wires connect the pads to an ECG (electrocardiogram) machine. The machine records the electrical activity of your heart.
  • The table will then move you through the center of a large donut shaped scanner.
  • The contrast or dye might give you a metallic taste in your mouth and make you feel warm all over. This will last about 30 seconds and will not return.
  • As you move through the scanner, you will need to stay very still, and you will be asked to hold your breath for a few seconds.
  • Most tests only take about 20 minutes.
  • A registered CT Technologist will be taking your images and is trained to keep the radiation dose as low as possible.

What happens after the test?

  • There are no side effects to this test.
  • Please remember to drink plenty of water and if you are diabetic, do not take your metformin until after you’ve had your labs drawn and have been given permission to resume the medication.